Gensler: Regulation doesn’t go far enough

Commodity Futures Trading Commission chairman Gary Gensler believes proposed regulation by the Obama administration to govern derivative markets could contain loopholes.

Gensler tells the Washington Post that the legislation leaves significant elements of the market out of the reach of regulators and undermine efforts to combat fraud.  Of particular concern to Gensler is:

  •  certain types of derivatives used to bet on currencies could be exempt from regulators
  • minor derivative traders would not have to meet the robust trading requirements envisioned by the legislation.

He does, however, support the legislation:

A top federal regulator has urged Congress to adopt tougher rules to govern betting in exotic financial instruments known as derivatives than the Obama administration has proposed, warning that the administration’s new vision of market regulation could contain loopholes.

One of the Obama administration’s top priorities in its revamp is to regulate both derivatives and firms that trade them. READ MORE.

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Congress considers regulating derivatives

The Washington Post has a story about how Congress is debating legislation whether to regulate derivatives.

The legislation includes establishing a single agency to oversee credit and mortgage lending, to give the Federal Reserve new powers, and to tighten regulations over a host of financial firms and practices:

The Obama administration formally proposed legislation on Tuesday to regulate exotic financial instruments known as derivatives, the final piece of the broad rework of financial regulations to be delivered to Congress. READ MORE.

Learsy questions banks over role in oil speculation

Raymond J. Learsy, scholar and author of the Over a Barrel: Breaking Oil’s Grip on Our Future, has written an interesting piece in the Huffington Post that’s worth a read.

In his piece, Learsy looks at how investment banks turned bank holding companies like Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs have used the Tarp fund and other taxpayer bailout money from the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank and Treasury to speculate heavily in oil markets instead of lending to businesses and financing mortgages, which the money was intended for:

Here we go again. The same Financial Class that brought us to the edge of economic meltdown is now pressing its well connected pals and cronies on Wall Street, in Congress as well as its allies in the press and our OPEC cheering oil industry, to lay hands off the continued stripping America’s wealth through the gamed racket and egregiously profitable world of oil futures trading.

This week the Commodity Futures Exchange Commission (CFTC), responding to a national and international outcry that enough is enough, and in keeping with the Obama administration’s goal of tougher oversight, has finally decided to act. Reacting to Congressional pressures, a struggling industrial landscape and a beleaguered public, the CFTC announced that a series of restrictions on energy trading would be set forth. And here the CFTC and the American public’s outrage is not alone. Earlier this week the Wall Street Journal printed an Op-ed Essay (July 8,2009) jointly written by Prime Minister Gordon Brown of Great Britain and President Nicolas Sarkozy of France calling for “transparency and supervision of the oil futures market in order to reduce damaging speculation” (The WSJ, signaling its take on the issue placed the piece at the bottom of its pg.15 Opinion column). READ HERE.